Thursday, April 30, 2015

The Less Known Story of National HRD Network: An Autobiographic Account

The Untold story of NHRDN

1985 March 2:
Last session of the Workshop on Recent Experiences in HRD by XLRI Centre for HRD and L&T. As the session was concluding I had a sense of satisfaction that we shared very frankly and openly about HRD its understandings, misunderstanding, implementation, lack of it and so on. I have already decided to return back to IIM Ahmedabad from XLRI. Fr. Abraham also wanted to come to Ahmedabad to peruse his Ph. D. at Ahmedabad. No one was going to be left at XLRI CHRD. Fr. Abraham decided to continue the work while at Ahmedabad with the HRD Newsletter and other activities. 

The question arose: do we learn from each other like we have learnt in the last four days only if XLRI or L&T or IIM or any other such institution organises such National seminars. Is HRD not at an evolving stage we need to continuously share our experiences and thoughts irrespective of facilitation by XLRI or L&T or IIMs? The answer from the audience was “Yes” We should continue to share these experiences and make sure that we learn from each other.

Then I posed another question: should the 37 of us be the only ones to learn from each other? Should we not include others? The answer was yes. We should have many more.

Then I posed another question: Should we meet only once a while or meet more frequently. The answer was: more frequently.

Then I posed next question: Should we not do all this in our respective cities? Should we not disseminate what we have learnt from each other to others in our cities? The answer was yes.

How do we do that? Can we not from a body informally or formally to do this? The answer was “Yes”.
Rajen Gupta from Jyoti’s  ( now at MDI) suggested we call ourselves HRD Network as network has a meaning of being connected with each other and forming at the same time a whole.

The Network was  thus conceived on March 2nd, 1985. I took the responsibility to lead and asked for volunteers in each city. Kishore Rao and Prasanna volunteered from Bangalore, PVR Murthy and Chandrasekhar volunteered from Chennai. Rajen and perhaps Saurabh Dixit for Baroda and I agreed along with KK Verma for Ahmedabad. We decided to request P K Sanangi for Delhi. T P Raman and Mohan volunteered for Mumbai. Later Kantha Rao latter wrote to L&T and subsequently to me to start it in Hyderabad. We went on discussing this for the next few months in IIMA corridors. S Chandrasekhar was a frequent visitor to push this idea. My consulting work with L&T ECC got us to interact more frequently. In fact he managed to get the South Indian regional Chapter inaugurated by Madras Management Association. Dr. Thyagarajn readily agreed and facilitated as President of MMA. We created an occasion for it by organising a joint seminar by NHRDN and XLRI on performance appraisals at Madras. Fr. Abraham continued this through HRD newsletter from CHRD at XLRI  from Ahmedabad.

We used CHRD to mobilise funds for the newsletter. The deal used to be that any sponsor will give an article highlighting their HR practice. There will be an academic article and several case studies and news items and snippets. We gave the privilege to be the first sponsor to L&T. We did not ask any additional funds but used the surplus from the National Seminar for the first Newsletter. The next one was financed my good friend T Shanmugam from State Bank of Patiala, the third from PVR from Sundaram Clayton, and the fourth from Hindustan petroleum here I was consulting from IIMA. The next one from MMTC when Mr. S V S Raghavan visited IIMA. It went on free of cost. We printed a free membership form for HRD Network and mailed to people. Fr Abraham mailed it too about 2000 every issue. There were no e-mails in those days. All surface mails. St Xavier’s Loyola students sued to help Fr Abraham to p writ envelops insert the newsletter in to the envelops etc.  It was printed here in Ahmedabad except the first one at Jamshedpur  and a few years latter all shifted to Jamshedpur.

We planned a conference in 1987 and wanted it to be a benchmarkable one. I  learnt a few lessons from the International conference held at IIMA by Prof Khandwalla and a few others from ISTD I used to attend. We wanted it world class. The L&T culture at Madras (Chennai) helped as Chandrasekhar will be the program manager. He organised everything meticulously. We got  Economic  Times devote a full page for the conference. I requested the editor Manu Shroff who was my colleague at IIMA and he readily agreed. 

For all these we registered NHRDN in December 1986. Mr. K K Nair Executive secretary of AMA got the memorandum papers cyclostyled made documents and took me on his two wheeler to Charity Commissioner’s office for registration. It was decided in a meeting held at my house No.  424, IIMA where all founder trustees came and my wife served some nice snacks and rasgollas. For registration  we gave the address as my own office address Wing No 15 IIMA.  IIMA encouraged such institution building activities as a part of professionalization of management. In fact when the Academy was started by NHRDN, M R R Nair wrote to Director IIMA (Prof. N R Sheth) for sparing my time for it as an Institution Building activity. Director IIMA formally approved my being Honorary Director of AHRD and the only requirement he ahs d was that I should document my experiences and make it available as a part of the Ravi Matthai centre.


The real birth of NHRDN began with the successful conduct of the first Conference. This conference  distributed a book on the first day containing conference papers, had a CEO conclave attended by most famous CEOs of that time ( M V Subbaiah, M V Arunachalam, Deenadayal, Dr Krishnamurthy, K K Nohria etc. ) and a well attended General Body meeting that laid the foundation for next few conferences and their philosophy. I remember a comment made by on Meenakshi Khasliwal (Nair) in the AGM that the discussions were too manager-centric and we seem to have forgotten workers. HRD can’t be focussed on managers alone. We decided that the next conference will be on workmen. MRR Nair made this happen with all his contacts two years later. Arvind Agarwal, Shashi  Khanna, P K Sarangi, Anil Sachdev, Rakesh Kumar played very significant roles and M R R Nair took over as second President of NHRDN. 

Sunday, April 12, 2015

TVRLS HR Competencies Model

TVRLS Competency List for HRD Professionals
(Extracts from the books on “HRD Audit” by T. V. Rao, Sage, 2014 and “HRD Score Card 2500” by T. V. Rao, Sage, 2008)
TVRLS developed a competency model for HR professionals. In my book on HRD Missionary published in 1990 I have given a list of competencies very elaborately. The details published subsequently in my books on HRD Score Card 2500 and HRD Audit second edition are highlighted here.

Out of its own research and experience T V Rao Learning Systems Pvt Ltd has identified the following ten set of competencies as required by HR professionals to be successful and make a difference.

1. Business Knowledge: Knowledge of business (products, services, customers, technology, competitors, developments, R&D) and all functions (Sales and marketing, Production and operations, Finance, systems, MIS, logistics, services etc.), Knowledge of Business capital (intellectual capital) and its constituents and methods of building Business capital:
·         Knows all about business, competitors, products and services, demand for the products and services, market share of the company, raw material and supply systems, share value and pricing information, competitors and likely competitors familiar with financial parameters of business ;
·         Knows about the vision, mission and values of the company ;
·         Knows about the nature of work, familiar with the technology used ;
·         Knows technical details to some extent. Can converse with a customer;  
·         Knows and appreciate all functions in the company ;
·         Familiar with balance sheet figures, sources of profit, and informed about value-adding activities of the company. Also knows about the intellectual capital of the company and the portion of fixed assets to the market value of the company, etc.;
·         Has world-wide knowledge
·         Has thorough knowledge about these matters, and  constantly updating self  with the changing scenario, and information)
2. Functional Excellence: (i)  HR Knowledge, (ii) HR Delivery including culture sensitivity, empathy, coaching and facilitation:
·         Highly-trained & professionalised in their field. Have had the required professional preparation.
·         Familiar with the theory and practice behind HR, especially in terms of, various systems and practices in relation to manpower planning, recruitment, testing, induction, integration and assimilation, retention research and strategies, PMS, potential appraisal, ADCs, retirements management, training, e-learning, HRIS, SAP and ERP applications, implementation issues, employee engagement surveys, organizational structuring, issues and cultural problems, and cautions in mergers and acquisitions, etc.
·         Culturally sensitive. If concerned with overseas operations is familiar with the cultures where the company has its business (for example, China, US and UK, African countries, Indonesia, etc.).
·         Makes effort to learn about the cultures where the business operates or plans to operate.
·         Shows a high degree of interpersonal sensitivity and empathy to the employees. Use the competencies  to resolve conflicts and sort out problems.
·         Have coaching and facilitation skills.
·         Good at execution and HR delivery.
3.  Leadership and Change Management: (i) Communication, (ii) Initiative, and (iii) creativity and (iv) Change management:
·         Excellent written communication skills.
·         Good at communicating orally, and negotiates and presents well.
·         Participated in change management earlier successfully, and had the required skills to introduce and manage change.
·         Known to be great initiative taker, and has put the HR of the company on the national or international map.
·         Participates in dissemination of HR practices and gets ideas from such participation.
·         Creative.
·         Takes part in change, participates in local initiatives, community work, innovations, global and local seminars, and leads discussion.
·         Encourages juniors to take lead roles, and build their competencies.
·         Contributes to brand building and intellectual capital formation of the company.

4.  Strategic Thinking: Analytical ability, cost and quality sensitivity, Ability to spot opportunities, anticipate and find alternate ways of solving problems:  
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
5.  Personal Credibility:
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
6. Technology Savvy: including HR technology and Research Methods
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
7. Personnel Management and Administrative skill
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
8. Vision of the function and Entrepreneurship
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
9. Learning Attitude and Self Management: (i) self awareness and desire to learn (ii) Time management, (iii) Networking, (iv) Research and analytical skills
(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)
10. Execution Skills: (i) Planning and Monitoring skills, (ii) cultural sensitivity, (iii) persuasive skills, (iv) Behaviour modification techniques and  group dynamics, (v) ability to  craft interventions for implementation, (vi) cost and quality sensitivity

(for details of the indicators see the book on HRD Score card 2500, by T. V. Rao Sage)

AUDITING HRD COMPETENCIES

HRD competencies can be audited using several methods. The more important ones are given below.

♦   Knowledge testing
♦   Attitudes and values
♦   Self-assessment by HR professionals
♦   Peer level assessment or 360-degree assessment
♦   Assessment of the HRD function or department by line managers
♦   Assessment centres

Knowledge Testing

The HRD profession in India has come of age. There is a body of knowledge available in India for the HRD profession. There are full-time master’s programmes, doctoral programmes and various other short-term courses. A good HRD manager is expected to have a basic minimum knowledge in HRD. The knowledge forms an essential component of HRD competencies. Without this knowledge base the HRD manager is not likely to perceive the roles needed and may not be able to perform them well. Just as knowledge of anatomy and physiology are important for becoming a doctor or a surgeon, the basic knowledge of HRD including that of adult learning, HRD tools, conditions of learning, etc., is essential for becoming a skilled HRD professional. Tests can be developed for assessing the knowledge base of any candidate. TVRLS, an HRD company, has developed a series of tests for assessing the knowledge base of HRD professionals. Some sample items from this test are presented in Chapter 9of the book on HRD Audit 2nd edition. The TVRLS–HRDKA Test deals with the basic knowledge required for HRD professionals.

Attitudes and Values

Some basic attitudes and values are needed for effective performance of HRD roles. These include a faith and self-confidence in one’s own ability to influence and make things happen—also known as the internal locus of control. Without faith in HRD, personal effectiveness attitudes, empathy and the right work values, the HRD manager will not be able to function well. There are a number of tests available to measure some of these variables. Some of these are presented in Chapter 11. These include TVRLS–HRD–LOC, the work values scale, personal effectiveness questionnaires and empathy questionnaire. Some questionnaires can be used from other sources as well.

Self-assessment and 360-degree Appraisal

HRD managers can assess themselves on the above-mentioned checklist. Such self-assessment can indicate the competence areas and competence gaps. This can be supplemented further by a 360-degree assessment. This may include the peers, bosses, direct reports and other internal and external customers. Two questionnaires in Chapter 11 entitled, Professional Preparation in HRD and HRD Profile Questionnaire, are also self-assessment questionnaires that provide information about the nature and extent of the professional preparation of the HRD manager.

Assessment of the Department or Internal Customer Satisfaction Surveys

The HRD audit questionnaires given in Chapter 11 have a section dealing with the assessment of the effective functioning of the HRD department or function. This assessment is made by the line managers and other respondents from the organisation and is likely to give a good evaluation of the effectiveness of the department. Internal customer satisfaction surveys also can be developed and used.

Skill Assessment through Assessment Centres

The HRD skills of the staff can be best evaluated by through an assessment centre. However, such assessment centres cannot be organised as a part of the HRD audit as they require special attention and focus, which makes them expensive and time-consuming. However, if the organisation has a large number of HR employees and is interested in building their competencies, it is useful to conduct an assessment centre for them to test their skill base. Such an assessment centre may use a variety of methods including simulation exercises such as an in-basket.
(Extracts of an illustrative audit report of the HRD function in an organisation is presented in the book on HRD Audit 2nd edition by T V Rao Box 8.7). 

Saturday, March 28, 2015

HRD Resources from the National HRD Network: Excellence Through HRD by M R R Nair & T V Rao

Copies of the papers summarised below are available from NHRDN Head office or write to : raotalam@gmail.com or tvrao@tvrao.com

Abstracts of Papers from the book:

Nair, M. R. R and Rao, T. V. (editors), Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity And Competitiveness, NHRDN, 1990 Conference papers for the National HRD network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi
(Reference: Nair and Rao, 1990)

1. Krishnamurthy, V; Towards Excellence in Productivity through HRD, in: Nair, M. R. R and Rao, T. V. (editors), Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity And Competitiveness, NHRDN, 1990 Conference papers for the National HRD network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, new Delhi; pages 3-15.


Abstract:
In this article, the author presents his experiences and insights from BHEL, Maruthi, SAIL, TISCO and Japanese organizations to support his conviction that productivity can be achieved mainly through people. The author conveys through this article that HRD is integrated into every aspect of Organizational life. Maruti promoted HRD by minimizing employee distinctions, focusing on their development and creating a family culture through communications and teamwork. SAIL turn around was achieved through priorities for action. The article concludes that the HRD manager’s commitment to the philosophy of HRD is imperative to the success of HRD. . – AV, TVRLS
Key words: HRD Manager; SAIL; Maruti; TISCO; Japanese management; Future of HRD Excellence in HRD

2. Krishna S.; HRD Issues/Opportunities-Top Management’s Views, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 16-24.

Abstract:
It is tempting to look for a ready-made way of organizing and structuring the HRD system in organizations. We can draw examples from some industrial successes of some of the advanced countries like Japan which has built a formidable economic strength by emphasizing on shared values, collective achievement and continuous development of human resources. But it is important to realize that these strategies have been successful since they were structured so as to suit their society and not by simply implanting them in entirety. If we adopt a strategy we need to ensure that it is modified to match the Indian society. We need to rediscover the unique Indian forms of “Man-Management” as they could easily offer a more enduring base because they are indigenous. It is the human resource that holds the key to sustained profitability and growth. – AV, TVRLS
Key words: Man-Management techniques, HRD Issues/Opportunities in view of Top Management

3. Nohria K.K.; Expectations of a Chief Executive from HRD, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 25-30.

Abstract:
To be an effective HRD one must be evolutionary in approach, is a catalyst for change, must have ability to honour a human being and trust their capabilities and have reflective insights. While being a primary facilitator an HRD can make direct contribution in the transformational process of an organization. HRD must be efficient at anticipating changes and readying the organization to respond appropriately for continued competitiveness. HRD can create the right environment through ensuring role clarity, goal orientation, effective appraisal, development etc of employees; developing organizational leaders, ensuring the enhancement of synergy through team development etc, being creative. HRD needs to work closely with the chief executives to influence the value systems of an organization and thus must develop organizational values such as openness, trust, expert-based-power, autonomy, justice, truthfulness, etc. HRD is an initiative based role. – AV, TVRLS
Key words: Role of HRD, employee development, synergy

4. Athreya M.B.; Line Manager Expectations from HRD on Productivity and Competitiveness, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 33-52.

Abstract:
HRD professional should raise managerial competence, strengthening managerial system discipline, deepening worker involvement and earning union partnership. Training and other HRD interventions, improve the knowledge, attitude and skills of maintenance labour, so as to increase both equipment availability, equipment reliability and capability for a sustained rate of output. Managerial interests in competitiveness has increased in two stages like defensive interests (to ensure survival in a growing competitive environment) and positive interest (to exploit opportunities that deregulation, autonomy and competition provide). HRD can respond to both these interests. There are several dimensions in competitiveness namely Quality, cost effectiveness, speed and innovation. HRD inputs are needed on Framework (which gives different time span, different function and different levels), Skills (providing initial inputs and updating managerial skills for planning, implementation and control), Appraisal and Rotation. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: HRD Action, Cost Effectiveness, Managerial Productivity, Capital Productivity, Cost Benefit Management Skills.

5. Ramaswamy .E .A; HRD Viewed from the Other End, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 53-59.

Abstract:
Managers would hasten to add the problem with permanent labour is not just its cost but also its attitude. Speaking more objectively much is happening to lend weight to labours appreciation. No impartial observer can fail to notice the all-out effort being made by industry to reduce the labour force. It is more important task is to ensure that managers from line functions take greater responsibility for the management of the human resources from day to day. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Permanent Labour, Cost of labour, HRD Functions, Management Levels

6. Nair M.R.R; Dynamics of HRD Process and Role of HRD Manager, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 63-79.

Abstract:
HRD has a significant role to play in establishing and maintaining a healthy productive work culture. Good Industrial Relations and effective systems of participation and a good collective bargaining framework is key to success of all HRD activities. In the organization contest, HRD is a means for improving effectiveness (in terms of better productivity, reduction if costs, better generation of internal resources, better profits and better customer service) and not an end in itself. Communication is the key to ensure the involvement of the employees. Generally organizations suffer from two weaknesses (A) Weakness in correctly identifying the problem. Once the problems are correctly identified, solutions are relatively easier to find. The problems in most cases are within the organization, but people tend that all is well with them. (B) There is considerable gap between generation of ideas and their implementation. Weakness of Indian Organizations is we tend to draw up action plans which look good but lag behind in their implementation. Training should be derived from the company’s objective. It should be need based, line-led. Training and Development should be staffed with right kind of people. There is a need to ensure a judicious use of internal and external training programmes. – AV, TVRLS
Key words: Involvement, Team Building, Organization Effectiveness, Commitment, Moral Competence, Productivity

7. Rao T.V.; HRD Manager and their Role, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 80-89.

Abstract:
Most frequently used HRD Instruments are Role Analysis, Performance Planning, Performance Analysis and review, Performance Counselling, Induction Training, Training, Job Rotation, Quality Circles, Task Forces, Managerial Learning Networks, etc. HRD Department and their Tasks are Developing A human resources, Keep Inspiring the Line Manager, Contently Plan, be aware of the business, work with unions, Influence personal policies. HRD Department has high inter-dependencies with the Personal Department. Personal Policies affect to a great extent the motivation and development of the employees as well as organizational health. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Spiritual Development, Power Trap, Empire Building Trap, Insulation Trap, O&M Department

8. Ramanujam G.; The Role of HRD Manager, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 90-95.

Abstract:
HRD will have to be individualized, personalized and humanized. Each employee, whether blue or white collared is a world by himself. He has his own particulars and prejudices too. He has already developed certain attitudes towards discipline, towards productivity, quality and generally towards his work. HRD manager must respect the human personality of the employees at all levels. Nature of the worker is to resist change. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Labour, Dis-Employment, Labour Welfare Officer, Personal Officer, Personal Department, Natural Justice

9. Gupta R.; Agenda for Professional Development, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 99-107.

Abstract:
Some of the areas where there is an even lesser competence available in HRD function are Designing of reward systems for HRD, Potential appraisal, career planning and development systems, OD and Development Process. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Role Analysis, Reward Management, Comprehensive educational programme, Self-Directed development, Learning Projects

10. Pareek U.; The Making of HRD Facilitator, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 108-115.

Abstract:
Development of concern for excellence and self –actualisation would contribute to the development of individual identity. Career planning and succession planning helps the process of identity formation. An organization gets its identity by developing a distinct culture value and norms (including rituals) leading to traditions by which the organization is known. HRD manager Collaborates with other managers to develop common understanding of the mission in the organization. Competencies can be developed by helping experience the value process. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Competency, Structural Arrangement, Training, HRD Facilitator, HRD Process

11. Dayal I.; Designing an HRD Programme, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 116-125.

Abstract:
Some basic considerations required to design and operate an HRD programmer are Learning Process, Cultural Factors, Managerial Orientation, and Administrative Strategy. Consideration for growth and development requires an individual must be involved personally in the process of development and know what new learning could lead to his growth, the organization would have to provide a variety of experiences to an individuals to learn from these experiences. Experience is also important for an individual to learn values, attitude, meaning of work. In the social environment of many Indian organizations, the concept of growth assumes by presenting a role model the supervisor officer expects his subordinates to become like himself and by constant inducement and direction the supervisor officer expects his subordinate to become an ideal person, as per his model. – AV, TVRLS
Key words: Administrative Strategy, Rational Factors, Psychological Growth, Managerial values, Review Systems

12. Kumar. P. M; HRD Transitions: An Experiential Snapshot, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 126-136.

Abstract:
Enlightened self-interest has pushed senior management to take HRD seriously in the face of social, Psychological and cultural changes in the society. Management education has played a critical role in underlining the potentials and possibilities of HRD. HRD does not fail because of lack of top or line management support only- more organizations are into HRD because senior executives support who is willing to persist with in the senior line executive who may prefer to concentrate on the “expedient” rather than the “important process issues. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Self-Doubt, HRD Manager, Line Manager, Hierarchical Authority

13. Mahesh .V.S; India in the 90’s: A Great Opportunity and Challenge for Human Resource Management Professional, in: Excellence Through Human Resource Development: Improving Productivity and Competitiveness, NHRDN, Conference papers for National HRD Network Symposium Madras, February, 1990, Published by Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi; pages 137-147.

Abstract:
Over the past decade, a few chief executives have rightly begun to place a greater emphasis on the proactive, development aspects of HRM. Unfortunately, many organizations have suffered due to the inadequacy of our fellow professionals some have lost their credibility due to mistaken attachments to specific tools and approaches such as Sensitive training , T.A., Gestalt therapy etc. Majority of jobs being created in India and elsewhere are in the front-line of service Industry, calling for a major exercise of empowerment of the lowest echelons of organizational hierarchies. To balance worker- representatives on the Board of Directors, the HRM professionals are going to be invited to join the Board: Wrong reason but right Opportunity. Accelerating rates of changes and obsolescence have led to organizations viewing themselves as learning Communities, Agents, the HRM professional’s role is paramount. – AV, TVRLS
Key Words: Flexitime, Physical Decentralization, HRM professional, HRM Practices

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

My encounters with Competency movement

Morning Muses: My encounters with Competency movement
T. V. Rao
1965- 66: Learnt about Lesson plans and how to teach concepts, knowledge, attitudes and skills (K, A,S) in B. Ed. course  at the Regional College of Education, Mysore from best Teachers like Dr. P N Dave, (just returned working at St. Louis with Richard D’ Charms), C L Anand and PR Nair
1966-68: Learnt all about learning theories, traits, types, self concept, 16 PF and many other tests including McClelland’s TAT for Achievement Motivation Training (AMT). MBTI was not yet popular
1969-70: Leant how to develop programmed material to teach K, A and S from a Certificate in NCERT of Programmed Learning.
1970: Reviewed R. F. Mager’s books on Instructional objectives that talked about cognitive, conative and affective domains and how Benjamin Blooms classification of educational objectives dealing with Knowledge, Attitudes and Skills.
1974: David McClelland walks into a paper presentation I was making at the Indian International centre, New Delhi when I was presenting the results of the evaluation of the Gujarat Entrepreneurship effort.  Manohar Nadkarni and Udai Pareek got him to listen to my findings as they proved that AMT created entrepreneurial movements and Behavioural tests helped in identifying potential entrepreneurs in Gujarat.
1975: David McClelland invites me on short term project as Research Associate at Harvard and East West Centre Hawaii invited me to present my findings. While with McClelland, he hands over an article written by him on “Testing for Competence than for Intelligence” published in American Psychologist and talks how AMT has limits for managerial success and power and psychosocial maturity matters more. I also learn the new methodology of assessing psychosocial maturity with Abigail Stewart at Wesleyan and McClelland at Harvard. We also analyze the TATs of Indian Managers was also taken to McBer and introduced to the staff there by David
1981: Udai Pareek and I attend a USAID meeting in Washington to discuss entrepreneurial and managerial competencies project, Lyle Spencer and Richard Boyatzis were present and Boyatzis gifts a draft copy of his forthcoming boo the competent Manager furthering the concept of competencies and new Interview methods used.
1984: David and team from Harvard conduct at EDI, Ahmedabad the new technique of Behaviour Interviewing to assess competencies. I was at XLRI and could not attend. I send Fr. Abraham to participate. Original notes still available with Fr. Abraham and me. EDI later makes a film of this method to assess competencies.
1986: I introduce the methodology to assess competencies through anonymous assessment by known people:  Leadership styles and organizational effectiveness program.
1986-1992 I Make efforts to assess competencies through Assessment centres and later what got to be termed in the USA as 360 Degree feedback.
1996: TVRLS starts programs on Competency mapping and Demystifying assessment centres and 360 degree feedback based on competencies
1997: TVRLS starts programs on Competency Mapping.
2000: Train the trainer in Competency mapping and Competency mapping education manuals prepared and published by TVRLS. TVRLS begins to popularise competency consulting and organises every year one or two train the trainer programs.

2000- 2015: TVRLS trains consultants for other well known consulting companies on competency mapping. Use of competency based assessment and development of competency models continues.